Behaviour Policy

12 April 2016

Behaviour Policy

Written: December 2002
Last Review: September 2015
Next Review: September 2017

Introduction

This document is written to guide teachers, non-teaching staff and Governors in ensuring that all pupils achieve good behaviour at Kells Lane Primary School. Great emphasis is placed on encouraging and praising positive behaviour. Aspects of good behaviour are also promoted in the school’s Citizenship and Health and Safety policies.

The Policy will address:

• Behaviour
• The Use of Positive Handling to control / restrain pupils
• Racial Harassment and Bullying

The views of teachers, non-teaching staff, pupils, governors and parents have been taken into account during the drawing up of this document.

Rationale

We believe that the ethos of the school is central to establishing and maintaining high standards of behaviour. Issues such as bullying, racial abuse and violence among pupils cannot and should not be tackled in isolation.
The quality of relationships, both adult and pupil, is of the utmost importance.
A calm, purposeful and productive atmosphere is necessary to promote good behaviour and ensure effective teaching and learning.
Communication is very important and pupils need to know what is expected of them in terms of what they are going to learn and how to be successful.

Aims

We aim to:

• Foster harmony, co-operation, tolerance, courtesy and consideration for others.
• Encourage the development of responsible thought and positive attitudes towards others, regardless of their gender, age, race, culture, ability, disability, sexual orientation or religious beliefs.
• Promote the self-esteem of all pupils, responding in a sensitive way to individual needs.
• Ensure that each child is free from harassment and fear so that he/she is able to focus on learning.
• Maintain a positive working atmosphere and impart a sense of order in children.
• Maintain the safety of pupils and staff, dealing with challenging behaviour in a skilful and professional manner.
• Impart and develop in others respect for people and property.
• Impart a sense of appropriate behaviour in different contexts. For example, on the playground, in assembly, in classrooms and when moving around the building.
• Involve parents in supporting and improving aspects of behaviour through Home School Agreement and by feedback at Parents’ Evenings.

1 Behaviour

Guidelines for maintaining good behaviour in and around the school.

We recognise that informal contact with pupils contributes to standards of behaviour. Staff maintain good behaviour by taking the initiative at every opportunity and by acting as positive role models. They: –

• Start up a dialogue
• Greet pupils
• Make themselves approachable at all times
• Deal with misbehaviour
• Set high standards of speech and manners
• Enjoy relating to pupils.

Break times

The Staff recognise that there are difficulties during breaks due to the multi floor nature of the building.
Staff on duty in the playground, patrol designated areas of the yard and are constantly monitoring children. First aid is administered to injured pupils by one of the Teaching Assistants.
During wet or severe weather all pupils are supervised by staff in their classrooms. Key Stage 1 – one teacher and one TA patrol the ground floor. Key Stage 2- one teacher patrols each floor. (See following paragraph for more detail)
Persistent bad behaviour must be reported to the Deputy Headteacher or to the Headteacher.

Lunchtime supervision

This is organised by the mid-day supervisors, after consultation with the Headteacher or Deputy Head. Children are never left unsupervised.
Staff should ensure that appropriate activities are made available for pupils to use during break times and lunchtimes when the weather is wet.
During wet or severe weather, the Key Stage 1 children are supervised in the hall and Key Stage 2 pupils are supervised in their classrooms with one supervisor to two classes.
Non-teaching staff are encouraged to give house points to reinforce good behaviour.
Persistent bad behaviour must be reported to the Phase Leaders, Deputy Head Teacher or to the Head Teacher.

Rewards

In school the emphasis is placed on positive achievements, which encourage and praise positive behaviour. Each class has a set of rules and expectations which were originally devised from survey sheets completed by the children. These are reviewed in classes and as a whole school at the beginning of each academic year.
Rewards are encouraged and given which compliment good behaviour, attitudes or work, thus placing the whole emphasis of school on achievement, effort and positive aspects of life in general. Motivational themes are introduced at the beginning of each week in a whole school assembly and individual pupil awards are presented, based on the weekly theme, during celebration assembly on a Friday. Both teaching staff and teaching assistants monitor the behaviour around school, particularly lining up after break times, coming into assembly and using the stairs. Classes which have shown consistent good behaviour are nominated by teaching assistants and lunch time supervisors. An award is then made during assembly to the class that has been the best role models throughout the week. The class which receives the most awards during the term will receive an additional reward. Rewards vary from class to class and are based on suggestions made by the children via the school council. Individual teachers or classes might also have additional rewards based on class targets. Individual children are also acknowledge for achievements outside of school in Friday Celebration Assembly. Examples of outstanding writing are also shared half-termly in assembly.

House Points

The school has four houses: Lions, Tigers, Panthers and Cheetahs. Children are split into one of the four houses when they start school. House points can be given for a wide variety of reasons including good work, good behaviour, sporting achievement, an improvement in work or behaviour, good manners, being kind or helpful, for trying hard and many more. These are recorded on House Point sheets which are clearly visible in each class. Year Six House Captains (or Year 5 Vice Captains) will collect weekly totals from each class. The totals are shared in Friday Celebration Assembly and the winning house is presented with the House Cup. Running totals are on display in the Key Stage 2 hall.

Awarding House points is given high significance by all adults in school. Marked House Points on work are shown using stars and stickers in Key Stage 1, stickers or HP in writing in Key Stage 2.

If an incident occurs, some of these sanctions may be imposed by a member of staff, only after all sides of the argument have been listened to.

1. Non-verbal clues-silence, disapproving gestures
2. Enquire into problem – having a “quiet word”
3. ‘Telling off’ – to individual pupil away from the group, if required (after thorough investigation of the incident)
4. Warning of punishment
5. Threat of/movement to another seat
6. Detention, under supervision during break
7. Threat by class teacher of a report to the Deputy Head or the Head Teacher
8. A verbal warning by the Head Teacher
9. Withdrawal of privileges or break time
10. Informing pupil of parental involvement in writing, on next occasion
11. Letter or phone call to parent with an invitation to discuss the behaviour of the pupil.

Dealing with More Difficult Behaviour

There may be a small number of pupils who give further cause for concern and who may need more specifically focused, individually based, programmes of behaviour and learning management. Staff are encouraged to record information that may be useful, should external agencies become involved.

Staff Procedures

• Observe what the pupil does as a result of what, and with what consequences.
• Observe how often and when the behaviour occurs. (Staff may use yard duty time) This is recorded in the weekly diary kept by the teacher.
• Low key positive intervention at first, which can be incorporated into the normal working day, e.g. extra praise for good behaviour, clarifying what the pupil has to do.
• Allow time for these to work
• Teachers monitor their own behaviour in terms of accidental reward of a pupil’s inappropriate behaviour.

Support Agencies may be asked to contribute: –

• The SEN teacher can shed light on individual behaviour with respect to particular learning difficulties
The pupil may also contribute to his/her own self-assessment. Through this self-assessment and discussion, the pupil should be encouraged to think positively about his/her work and behaviour. Learning may become more meaningful and manageable and hopefully their self-esteem will be raised
• The Educational Welfare Officer can provide a crucial link between home and school
If all fails, for an instance of unacceptable behaviour, the pupil may need to be excluded or suspended from school, in which case the Head Teacher will follow the LA Guidelines.

2 The Use of Positive Handling to Control/Restrain Pupils

Guidelines when using force to control or restrain a pupil

Whilst the majority of pupils at Kells Lane School present orderly and co-operative behaviour there is a possibility that a minority could present problems for staff in the management of their behaviour. Even among the majority, occasional incidents can arise which may make particular demands on the resourcefulness of staff. Careful consideration has been given to strategies which emphasise and support positive behaviour and which de-escalate conflict.
We have also developed a range of strategies for dealing with challenging and confrontational behaviour by pupils, which minimises or avoids the necessity to use physical control or restraint. (See Dealing with Difficult behaviour.)
Staff do recognise, however, that despite everyone’s best efforts to defuse confrontational situations, physical control may need to be employed.
The use of physical control or restraint is viewed as a last resort at Kells Lane School. It will be used only if required in extreme circumstances

In these exceptional circumstances staff may be compelled to consider some degree of physical control in dealing with the extreme behaviour of a pupil.
If this is necessary then the procedures outlined in the LA Guidelines on the Use of Force to Control or Restrain Pupils will be followed. (Appendix 1- Report Sheet for such incidents.) If an Appendix 1 sheet is completed the Head Teacher will be informed.

3 Racial Harassment and Bullying

Guidelines for dealing with Incidents of Racism and Bullying

Bullying and racist incidents are aspects of behaviour which have received much attention. Our aim is to prevent any such incidents occurring at Kells Lane School. The Staff and pupils of the school will not accept any form of racist behaviour. For the purpose of this policy a racist incident will be considered to be:
‘Any incident which is perceived to be racist by the victim or by any other person.’ e.g. an onlooker

Racist incidents may manifest in several ways: –

• Derogatory name-calling – (discussed at Student Council)
• Insults and racist jokes – (discussed at Student Council)
• Racist graffiti
• Physical assault.

All forms of racial abuse will be treated seriously and dealt with within the disciplinary framework of the school, and in accordance with the School’s Racial Equality Policy. Action will always be taken to ensure that racist graffiti is removed as speedily as possible.

Supporting Victims

Victims of racial abuse will be given immediate comfort, support and reassurance, understanding and empathy for their situation.

• A commitment will always be made to resolve the situation.
• Any incident will be dealt with initially by the class teacher or person on duty.
• The matter will then be referred to the Head Teacher or Deputy Head teacher who will discuss the matter further with the pupil/s concerned.

Additional Action

Action will also be taken to explore, with all concerned, the exact chain of events leading to the incident:-

• Teachers will use their own professional judgement when responding to racist incidents
• There will be some occasions when an incident needs to be discussed with a whole group, at other times a ‘quiet word’ with individuals may be appropriate.
• A report of the incident, in line with Council Policy, must be completed and sent to the Deputy Director. A copy will be kept in a file in the Staff Room. (Appendix 2) If an Appendix 2 sheet is completed, then a copy will be kept by the Deputy Head and the Head Teacher will be notified.
• If the incident involves racist intent then the parents of both parties will be informed, of the nature of the incident and the action taken.
• Further discussions will take place with the parents, if it is felt necessary.

As part of social awareness education, staff discuss these issues with their classes from time to time. Pupils are made aware that any racial incident has a high priority and should be reported to staff.

Dealing with Incidents of Bullying

For the purpose of this policy a bully is: ‘Someone who deliberately and persistently sets out to hurt someone else by word or action.’(Definition given by a pupil) See Appendix 3 for updated pupil definition of bully

The staff and pupils of this school will not accept behaviour, which falls into any of the following categories: –

• Name calling
• Kicking, punching or hitting
• Picking on someone
• Teasing
• Forcing someone to do something against his or her will
• Being deliberately unkind to the same person on more than one occasion
• Exclusion from the group
• Cyber-bullying – bullying through the use of the internet, mobile phones, social networking sites.

It is also important to note that children’s relationships with others in school can vary tremendously. Children can be the best of friends one day and at loggerheads with each other the next.

We need to be aware that temporary breakdowns in relationships do not necessary constitute bullying.

Guideline for the prevention of bullying

• Staff will be watchful and observe relationships.
• There will be appropriate supervision of pupils during unstructured time. (See ‘Guidelines for maintaining good behaviour in and around the school’ page 2)
• Staff will be punctual for lessons.
• Staff will try to ensure that they are present in cloakrooms and on the stairs.
• The Community Police Officer is regularly invited into school to discuss bullying with pupils.
• Children are made aware that their teachers are contacts to whom they can talk freely. Adults are there for any child who feels that they are being bullied or who would like the opportunity to discuss any fears or worries in confidence.
• Discussions take place regularly during Student Council sessions.

Immediate Action to be taken when dealing with incidents of bullying

1. Stop the incident, separate the pupils, if necessary, and remove them from the immediate vicinity of other children. Confirm that the children are not physically injured. If children are injured, deal with this immediately
2. Make it clear that the behaviour is totally unacceptable to everyone in school
3. Show concern for the victim (in the presence of bully, if appropriate)
4. Wait for the pupils involved to calm themselves before trying to find out what happened. Listen carefully and establish the facts and factors involved
5. Ensure that the victim does not believe any hurtful things that have been said. Let him/her know that a determined effort will be made to stop the bullying. Encourage the bully to apologise, if appropriate
6. Discuss the incident, the problems behind it and possible solutions with both the victim and the bully. (The victim must be happy about this and needs to be given a choice.)
7. Outline the sanctions which will be imposed if the bullying continues
8. Try to talk rationally about why some people find it necessary to behave in such a way. Discuss how and why behaviour should change. Offer support with this.
9. Ensure everyone, (children and staff) have an understanding of the situation and will take action immediately, should there be a reoccurrence of the behaviour.

Support for Pupils

• Staff will look for ways to restore the lost confidence of the victim.
• If children are identified as victims or bullies their confidence, self-esteem and ability to make friends, should be enhanced, where possible, through classroom activities and sensitive treatment.
• A problem box is available for pupils to enlist Student Council support.

Informing Parents

Parents should be consulted if there are concerns about the behaviour of their child. They know their child, and may be able to help solve problems or provide information that could shed light on the situation or prevent another one occurring.

Appendix 1

Details of person/pupil who had to be restrained:

Name ……………………………………………………………………………………………………….…

Age ………………………………………………… Class …………………………………………………

Restraint applied by:

Name …………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Position ………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Restraint was used: (please tick as appropriate)

Details of incident date, time, location, those involved etc:

Outline of action taken:

Outcome:

Reported to ………………………………………………………….… at (time) ………………………….

at (place) ………………………………………………………………………………………………….……

Signed (witness) ……………………………………………………………………………………………….

Signed (person to whom reported) ……………………………………………………………………………

Appendix 2

Details of person subject to racial harassment/abuse:

Name ……………………………………………………………………………………………………….…

Age ………………………………………………… Class …………………………………………………

Complaint reported by:

Name …………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Position ………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Nature of complaint: (Verbal, graffiti, attack on person/property or other)

Details of incident date, time, location, those involved etc:

Outline of action taken:

Outcome:

Reported to ………………………………………………………….… at (time) ………………………….

at (place) ………………………………………………………………………………………………….……

Signed (witness) ……………………………………………………………………………………………….

Signed (person to whom reported) …………………………………………………………………………

Appendix 3

Bullying Statement

A person or a group who deliberately, sets out to hurt another, either physically or emotionally.